Margaret Laughlin Riddleberger, or simply, ‘Mizzar’

mizzar at home 05-07

Mizzar (Margaret Laughlin Riddleberger), as she was called by her students, had a voice studio in New York City and Washington, D.C., taught singing voice for her Montgomery County in adult Ed. for many years, and was a guest consultant at the Tomatis Institute teaching them how to accomplish physically what Dr. Tomatis accomplished with his listening improvement technology.

She was quite a fabulous woman! Having been taught to sing from a Washington, D.C. socialite/metaphysician who taught folks at the Metropolitan Opera In NYC for many years.  She had been recommended to ‘Teach’ by a protoge of her orginal voice teacher, Clegg.

davidMargaret Laughlin Riddleberger, or simply, ‘Mizzar’

LOCAL JAZZ SINGER

A woman I know in town gave me an CD of her singing.  She sings jazz and I really was impressed with the fact that she sounded like herself and I could as well understand all the words which is pretty rare nowadays; and the power is in the word and the sound combined.  And  the musicians who backed her up were great!

davidLOCAL JAZZ SINGER

A PROBLEM THAT YOU ARE UNAWARE OF, STILL EXISTS!

By David Delaney, MA, CAR

david@singingvoicetraining.com

Shana comes to me through a recommendation of a fellow singer. She is having vocal difficulties and does not know why it is happening. I can hear over the phone the first time we talk that she has a mild ‘glottal fry’ and she is gasping for breath constantly. This is someone who speaks with a degree of tension in her throat and it produces a low popping or rattling sound when air passes through the throat. If you try to sing with this going on, you are likely to have at minimum a sore throat and at maximum more serious vocal difficulties. Shana is unaware of it’s existence though.

davidA PROBLEM THAT YOU ARE UNAWARE OF, STILL EXISTS!

VOCAL DIFFICULTIES: WHAT TO DO WHEN THE PRESSURE IS ON

 

Shana comes to me through a recommendation of a fellow singer.  She is having vocal difficulties and does not know why it is happening.  I can hear, even over the phone the first time we talk, that she has a mild ‘glottal fry’.  This is someone who speaks with a degree of tension in his or her throat and it produces a low popping or rattling sound when air passes through the throat.  If you try to sing with this going on, you are likely to have at minimum a sore throat and at maximum more serious vocal difficulties.

davidVOCAL DIFFICULTIES: WHAT TO DO WHEN THE PRESSURE IS ON

TRAINING THE PERFORMING ARTIST WITH NEUROFEEDBACK

 

Neurofeedback training and the performing artist…

 

George (not his real name) is a seasoned singer/performer with many years of experience performing for audiences.  However, he has always had to deal with a low self-esteem issue that, even though he is loved by the audiences her performs for, he questions his skill and this affects his performance of course.  He was referred to me by a voice therapist who knew about my background in the performing arts and suspected that I might be able to help him.

 

davidTRAINING THE PERFORMING ARTIST WITH NEUROFEEDBACK

THE SINGER’S ‘CIRCUIT’ FOR RESONANT SOUND PRODUCTION

by David Delaney, MA, CAR, LPC

david@singingvoicetraining.com

When we talk about singing, we are really need to say ‘talk-singing’, since speech is the basis of all singing, whether operatic singing, pop, Broadway, rap, or whatever style. It is all a similar physiological process. Many people have been taught, and thus believe, that it is the vocal chords (vocal folds) that are the center of voice production, but this is not accurate. Voice production begins with natural speaking in the mouth, not in the throat.  The vocal folds produce an embryonic vibration which is not speech, but which is picked up at the mouth and teeth, and turned into speech, and eventually singing.

davidTHE SINGER’S ‘CIRCUIT’ FOR RESONANT SOUND PRODUCTION